Phalanx on JS Hyuga

MK.15 IB on JS Hyuga

December 4/20: Korea The US State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to the Republic of Korea of two (2) MK 15 MOD 25 Phalanx Close-In Weapons System (CIWS) Block 1B Baseline 2 (IB2) systems and related equipment for an estimated cost of $39 million. The Republic of Korea has requested to buy two (2) MK 15 MOD 25 Phalanx Close-In Weapons System (CIWS) Block 1B Baseline 2 (IB2) systems; and four thousand (4,000) rounds, 20MM cartridge API linked. Also included are spare parts; other support equipment; ammunition; books and other publications; software; training; engineering technical assistance and other technical assistance; and other related elements of the program and logistical support. The estimated total cost is $39 million. The proposed sale will improve the Republic of Korea’s capability to meet current and future threats. Korea will use the systems aboard its first KDX III Batch II Class destroyer to provide it with effective means of detecting and defending itself against incoming airborne threats. The Republic of Korea will have no difficulty absorbing this equipment into its armed forces.

Phalanx CIWS Firing

Phalanx, firing
(click to view full)

The radar-guided, rapid-firing MK 15 Phalanx Close-In Weapons System (CIWS, pron. “see-whiz”) can fire between 3,000-4,500 20mm cannon rounds per minute, either autonomously or under manual command, as a last-ditch defense against incoming missiles and other targets. Phalanx uses closed-loop spotting with advanced radar and computer technology to locate, identify and direct a stream of armor piercing projectiles toward the target. These capabilities have made the Phalanx CIWS a critical bolt-on sub-system for naval vessels around the world, and led to the C-RAM/Centurion, a land-based system designed to defend against incoming artillery and mortars.

This DID Spotlight article offers updated, in-depth coverage that describes ongoing deployment and research projects within the Phalanx family of weapons, the new land-based system’s new technologies and roles, and international contracts from FY 2005 onward. As of Feb 28/07, more than 895 Phalanx systems had been built and deployed in the navies of 22 nations.

Displaying 334 of 10,058 words (about 26 pages)

The Phalanx Platform: Competition, Upgrades &
Developments

Phalanx: New Frontiers

Phalanx: Competitors

Phalanx Contracts and Key Events

FY 2014 – 2020

FY 2012-2013

FY 2011

FY 2010

FY 2009

FY 2008

FY 2007

FY 2006

FY 2005

Additional Readings

Competitors

Phalanx maintenance

Phalanx maintenance

(click to view full)

SeaRAM

SeaRAM

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Phalanx C-RAM

Phalanx C-RAM

(click to view full)

AN-TPQ-36 Firefinder

AN/TPQ-36 Firefinder

CIWS Goalkeeper and Sea Harrier

Thales Goalkeeper

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MK15 Phalanx on Canadian frigate

MK15, HMCS Ottawa

(click to view full)

December 4/20: Korea The US State
Department has made a determination approving a possible

Foreign Military Sale
to the Republic of Korea of two
(2)

MK 15 MOD 25 Phalanx Close-In Weapons System (CIWS)
Block 1B Baseline 2 (IB2) systems and related equipment
for an estimated cost of $39 million. The Republic of
Korea has requested to buy two (2) MK 15 MOD 25 Phalanx
Close-In Weapons System (CIWS) Block 1B Baseline 2 (IB2)
systems; and four thousand (4,000) rounds, 20MM cartridge
API linked. Also included are spare parts; other support
equipment; ammunition; books and other publications;
software; training; engineering technical assistance and
other technical assistance; and other related elements of
the program and logistical support. The estimated total
cost is $39 million. The proposed sale will improve the
Republic of Korea’s capability to meet current and future
threats. Korea will use the systems aboard its first KDX
III Batch II Class destroyer to provide it with effective
means of detecting and defending itself against incoming
airborne threats. The Republic of Korea will have no
difficulty absorbing this equipment into its armed
forces.

September 1/20: Taiwan Taiwan

decided not to buy three sets
of Centurion C-RAM
system from the US after it was told by the Pentagon that
no evaluation testing data exists for the Centurion.
Taiwan had wanted the Centurion to act as an area
defensive weapon system to protect its airfields but the
system can only do point defense. Therefore, the military
has decided to invite the local National Chung-Shan
Institute of Science and Technology (NCSIST) to modify
the

Phalanx close-in weapon system (CWIS) for its needs.
The institute had previously taken a Phalanx CIWS from
the Navy’s Yang-class destroyer and installed it on a
mountain top to protect the Songshan radar station on the
top of Zhuzi Mountain. A total of seven Gearing-class
destroyers transferred to Taiwan as the Yang-class had
been upgraded under Wu Chin III program that turn these
World War Two ships into guided-missile destroyers.
However, since the Air Force’s requirement is for area
defense, the new system will have to be integrated with
the service’s Sky Guard air defense system. It will
modify existing Phalanx CIWS in the inventory for the
purpose.

Phalanx on JS Hyuga

MK.15 IB on JS Hyuga

(click to view full)

Phalanx reloading

Phalanx, reloaded

(click to view full)

Phalanx UK Firing Night

UK Phalanx at night

(click to view full)

Phalanx calibration

Calibration on CVN 73

(click to view full)

Phalanx CIWS White

Phalanx CIWS

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This Phalanx story, along with Defense Industry Insider’s cross-referenced materials on related platforms, includes the following resources:

  • 7 pictures including numerous photos of the ship platforms and land platforms. Also, the link to a video clip of the weapon in action against a ship-side incoming missile
  • Coverage of the land-based C-RAM models
  • A chronology of events, contracts, competitions, international interests, deployment plans in active theaters, subcontractors and other items of interest extending back to 2004
  • Cross reference to systems of similar function and purpose, as well as alternative configurations and uses
  • Deep program references on systems employing the Phalanx, such as Australia’s Hobart Class ships, the National Security Cutters, FSF-1, Littoral Combat Ship, LHA-R, and many others
  • Additional readings

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